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SEC Filings
S-3ASR
NUSTAR ENERGY L.P. filed this Form S-3ASR on 07/02/2019
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giving effect to these distributions, the priority and characterization of distributions otherwise applicable under our partnership agreement is maintained as nearly as is practicable. Please read “—Administrative Matters—Information Returns and Audit Procedures.” Each unitholder is urged to consult its tax advisor to determine the consequences to him of any tax payment we make on his behalf.

Allocation of Income, Gain, Loss and Deduction

In general, if we have a net profit, our items of income, gain, loss and deduction will be allocated among the common unitholders in accordance with their percentage interests in us. If we have a net loss, our items of income, gain, loss and deduction will be allocated among the common unitholders in accordance with their percentage interests in us to the extent of their positive capital accounts.

Specified items of our income, gain, loss and deduction will be allocated under Section 704(c) of the Code to account for (1) any difference between the tax basis and fair market value of our assets at the time of an offering or issuance and (2) any difference between the tax basis and fair market value of any property contributed to us that exists at the time of such contribution, together referred to in this discussion as “Contributed Property.”

In the event we issue additional units or engage in certain other transactions in the future, “Reverse Section 704(c) Allocations,” similar to the Section 704(c) allocations described above, will be made to all partners to account for the difference, at the time of the future transaction, between the “book” basis for purposes of maintaining capital accounts and the fair market value of all property held by us at the time of the future transaction. In addition, items of recapture income will be allocated to the extent possible to the unitholder who was allocated the deduction giving rise to the treatment of that gain as recapture income in order to minimize the recognition of ordinary income by other unitholders. Finally, although we do not expect that our operations will result in the creation of negative capital accounts, if negative capital accounts nevertheless result, items of our income and gain will be allocated in an amount and manner sufficient to eliminate the negative balance as quickly as possible.

An allocation of items of our income, gain, loss or deduction (other than an allocation required by Section 704(c) to eliminate the difference between a partner’s “book” capital account, credited with the fair market value of Contributed Property, and the “tax” capital account, credited with the tax basis of Contributed Property, referred to as “Book-Tax Disparity”) will generally be given effect for U.S. federal income tax purposes in determining a unitholder’s share of an item of income, gain, loss or deduction only if the allocation has substantial economic effect. In any other case, a unitholder’s share of an item will be determined on the basis of his interest in us, which will be determined by taking into account all the facts and circumstances, including (1) his relative contributions to us; (2) the interests of all the partners in profits and losses; (3) the interests of all the partners in cash flows and other non-liquidating distributions; and (4) the rights of all the partners to distributions of capital upon liquidation. Sidley Austin LLP is of the opinion that, with the exception of the issues described in “—Section 754 Election,” “—Uniformity of Common Units” and “—Disposition of Common Units—Allocations Between Transferors and Transferees,” allocations of income, gain, loss and deduction under the partnership agreement will be given effect for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

Treatment of Securities Loans

A unitholder whose common units are the subject of a securities loan (for example, a loan to a “short seller” to cover a short sale of units) may be considered as having disposed of those units. If so, he would no longer be treated for tax purposes as a partner with respect to those units during the period of the loan and may recognize gain or loss from the disposition. As a result, during this period (1) any of our items of income, gain, loss or deduction with respect to those units would not be reportable by the lending unitholder and (2) any cash distributions received by the lending unitholder as to those units may be treated as ordinary taxable income.

Because there is no direct or indirect controlling authority on this issue relating to partnership interests, Sidley Austin LLP has not rendered an opinion regarding the tax treatment of a unitholder that enters into a securities loan with respect to his common units. Unitholders desiring to assure their status as partners and avoid the risk of income recognition from a loan of their common units are urged to consult with their own tax advisors to discuss whether it is advisable to modify any applicable brokerage account agreements to prohibit their brokers from borrowing and lending their common units. The IRS has previously announced that it is studying issues relating to the tax treatment of short sales of partnership interests. Please also read “—Disposition of Common Units—Recognition of Gain or Loss.”

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